Chapter 11:This is designed for businesses. Chapter 11 is often referred to as “reorganization bankruptcy” because it gives businesses a chance to stay open while they restructure the business’ debts and assets so it can pay back creditors. This is used primarily by large corporations like General Motors, Circuit City and United Airlines, but can be used by any size business, including partnerships and in some rare cases, individuals. Though the business continues to operate during bankruptcy proceedings, most of the decisions are made with permission from the courts.
There are two alternative systems that can be used to "exempt" property from a bankruptcy estate, federal exemptions[38] (available in some states but not all), and state exemptions (which vary widely between states). For example, Maryland and Virginia, which are adjoining states, have different personal exemption amounts that cannot be seized for payment of debts. This amount is the first $6,000 in property or cash in Maryland,[39] but normally only the first $5,000 in Virginia.[40] State law therefore plays a major role in many bankruptcy cases, such that there may be significant differences in the outcome of a bankruptcy case depending upon the state in which it is filed.
Please note that we cannot guarantee the results or outcome of your particular procedure. For instance, the government may reject a trademark application for legal reasons beyond the scope of LegalZoom's service. In some cases, a government backlog can lead to long delays before your process is complete. Similarly, LegalZoom does not guarantee the results or outcomes of the services rendered by our legal plan attorneys or attorney-assisted products. Problems like these are beyond our control and are not covered by this guarantee.
In Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the debtor retains ownership and control of assets and is re-termed a debtor in possession (DIP).[50] The debtor in possession runs the day-to-day operations of the business while creditors and the debtor work with the Bankruptcy Court in order to negotiate and complete a plan. Upon meeting certain requirements (e.g., fairness among creditors, priority of certain creditors) creditors are permitted to vote on the proposed plan.[51] If a plan is confirmed, the debtor continues to operate and pay debts under the terms of the confirmed plan. If a specified majority of creditors do not vote to confirm a plan, additional requirements may be imposed by the court in order to confirm the plan. Debtors filing for Chapter 11 protection a second time are known informally as "Chapter 22" filers.[52]
Generally, I start with an initial telephone consultation. Then if you want to move forward, we schedule an in-person conference at my office to go over the legal services agreement and your documents and for you to make the first payment. After that I represent you against your creditors until you are paid in full and then about two weeks after that I file your case. 

Relief under Chapter 13 is available only to individuals with regular income whose debts do not exceed prescribed limits.[55] If the debtor is an individual or a sole proprietor, the debtor is allowed to file for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy to repay all or part of the debts. Secured creditors may be entitled to greater payment than unsecured creditors.[53]


Generally, I start with an initial telephone consultation. Then if you want to move forward, we schedule an in-person conference at my office to go over the legal services agreement and your documents and for you to make the first payment. After that I represent you against your creditors until you are paid in full and then about two weeks after that I file your case. 
Tax refunds you are entitled to receive are considered property in bankruptcy just like money in your bank account. You must disclose any anticipated tax refunds as an asset on your bankruptcy schedules. This means that if you want to keep your refund, you must be able to exempt it. If you can exempt your tax refund in Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you can keep it. 
Bankruptcy is the legal proceeding involving a person or business that is unable to repay outstanding debts. The bankruptcy process begins with a petition filed by the debtor, which is most common, or on behalf of creditors, which is less common. All of the debtor's assets are measured and evaluated, and the assets may be used to repay a portion of outstanding debt.
When you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the court—and your creditors—assume that you’ll stop making payments on bills that will get discharged (wiped out) in your bankruptcy case and use the funds to pay legal fees instead. For instance, credit card payments, medical bills, past-due utility payments, and personal loans (such as payday loans) usually qualify for a discharge.
How to File for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy provides clear, user-friendly information and all the forms you need to get through the entire bankruptcy process. The book and the local resources you'll find on LegalConsumer.com are a perfect combination. The book is designed to work with LegalConsumer.com's means test calculator and lists of Pennsylvania exemption laws, which determine what property you'd get to keep in bankruptcy.
For companies, formal bankruptcy is a normal effect of insolvency, even if there is a reconstruction mechanism where the company can be given time to solve its situation, e.g. by finding an investor. The formal bankruptcy involves contracting a bankruptcy manager, who makes certain that assets are sold and money divided by the priority the law claims, and no other way. Banks have such a priority. After a finished bankruptcy for a company, it is terminated. The activities might continue in a new company which has bought important assets from the bankrupted company.

The affordable Arizona bankruptcy attorneys and debt relief specialists work with our clients to better educate them on their case to ensure they know we are right there with them. We will guide you every step of the way while filing chapter 13 or chapter 7 bankruptcy.  We take pride in making sure our clients are prepared for ‘Life After Bankruptcy’.


Individuals or businesses with few or no assets file Chapter 7 bankruptcy. The chapter allows individuals to dispose of their unsecured debts, such as credit cards and medical bills. Individuals with nonexempt assets, such as family heirlooms (collections with high valuations, such as coin or stamp collections), second homes, cash, stocks, or bonds, must liquidate the property to repay some or all of their unsecured debts. So, a person filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy is basically selling off his or her assets to clear debt. Consumers who have no valuable assets and only exempt property, such as household goods, clothing, tools for their trades, and a personal vehicle up to a certain value, repay no part of their unsecured debt.
A trustee in bankruptcy must be either an Official Receiver (a civil servant) or a licensed insolvency practitioner. Current law in England and Wales derives in large part from the Insolvency Act 1986. Following the introduction of the Enterprise Act 2002, a UK bankruptcy now normally last no longer than 12 months, and may be less if the Official Receiver files in court a certificate that investigations are complete. It was expected that the UK Government's liberalization of the UK bankruptcy regime would increase the number of bankruptcy cases; initially, cases increased, as the Insolvency Service statistics appear to bear out. Since 2009, the introduction of the Debt Relief Order has resulted in a dramatic fall in bankruptcies, the latest estimates for year 2014/15 being significantly less than 30,000 cases.
In Chapter 13, debtors retain ownership and possession of all their assets, but must devote some portion of future income to repaying creditors, generally over three to five years.[53] The amount of payment and period of the repayment plan depend upon a variety of factors, including the value of the debtor's property and the amount of a debtor's income and expenses.[54] Under this chapter, the debtor can propose a repayment plan in which to pay creditors over three to five years. If the monthly income is less than the state's median income, the plan is for three years, unless the court finds "just cause" to extend the plan for a longer period. If the debtor's monthly income is greater than the median income for individuals in the debtor's state, the plan must generally be for five years. A plan cannot exceed the five-year limit.[54]
Generally, I start with an initial telephone consultation. Then if you want to move forward, we schedule an in-person conference at my office to go over the legal services agreement and your documents and for you to make the first payment. After that I represent you against your creditors until you are paid in full and then about two weeks after that I file your case. 
Our Glendale, Arizona debt relief experts offer free consultations.  Call us today and find out what types of debt relief are available to you and your family.  Let our low priced bankruptcy lawyers in Glendale explain the difference between Chapter 7 bankruptcy and Chapter 13 bankruptcy.  Our Glendale and Avondale bankruptcy offices offer some of the lowest legal fees on all of our bankruptcy filings.  Compare our rates, we know our bankruptcy fees are the lowest!  Find Arizona’s best bankruptcy lawyers.
The most common types of personal bankruptcy for individuals are Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. Chapter 7, known as a "straight bankruptcy" involves the discharge of certain debts without repayment. Chapter 13, involves a plan of repayment of debts over a period of years. Whether a person qualifies for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 is in part determined by income.[43][44] As many as 65% of all U.S. consumer bankruptcy filings are Chapter 7 cases.
Our Glendale, Arizona debt relief experts offer free consultations.  Call us today and find out what types of debt relief are available to you and your family.  Let our low priced bankruptcy lawyers in Glendale explain the difference between Chapter 7 bankruptcy and Chapter 13 bankruptcy.  Our Glendale and Avondale bankruptcy offices offer some of the lowest legal fees on all of our bankruptcy filings.  Compare our rates, we know our bankruptcy fees are the lowest!  Find Arizona’s best bankruptcy lawyers.
Chapter 13 means the court approves a plan for you to repay some or all of your debts over three to five years. You get to keep your assets (stuff you own) and you’re given time to bring your mortgage up to date. You agree to a monthly payment plan and must follow a strict budget monitored by the court. This kind of bankruptcy stays on your credit report for seven years.
*** If we make a mistake in your bankruptcy petition that leads to you not receiving a discharge in your bankruptcy case we will refund you 100% of the attorney fees. We reserve the right to do whatever is possible to address any issue that may arise in your case at our own expense.  We are not guaranteeing you a result in your bankruptcy case or that you will receive a discharge of all of your debts or any one debt. There are debts that are not dischargeable pursuant to the Bankruptcy Code. Your bankruptcy case may also involve litigation that is independent of you receiving a discharge in your bankruptcy case. We cannot guarantee that that you will obtain a discharge of any one specific debt, or of all debts.
A typical proposal would involve a debtor making monthly payments for a maximum of five years, with the funds distributed to their creditors. Even though most proposals call for payments of less than the full amount of the debt owing, in most cases, the creditors accept the deal—because if they do not, the next alternative may be personal bankruptcy, in which the creditors get even less money. The creditors have 45 days to accept or reject the consumer proposal. Once the proposal is accepted by both the creditors and the Court, the debtor makes the payments to the Proposal Administrator each month (or as otherwise stipulated in their proposal), and the general creditors are prevented from taking any further legal or collection action. If the proposal is rejected, the debtor is returned to his prior insolvent state and may have no alternative but to declare personal bankruptcy.
Generally, I start with an initial telephone consultation. Then if you want to move forward, we schedule an in-person conference at my office to go over the legal services agreement and your documents and for you to make the first payment. After that I represent you against your creditors until you are paid in full and then about two weeks after that I file your case. 
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