When you wrote about the meaning of being an apostle, which in most of the forms of its use means a person who follows an ideal, you said that there were none in this age of the church. However aside from the eleven we know and the countless others Christ Jesus showed himself to after the resurrection, we see another example in Paul. He saw Christ and was ordained to be an apostle well after, Would it be strange to believe that something like this would occur throughout all generations until the return. I am no Biblical powerhouse, but this seems to me a more than reasonable thought.
The next gift is the ability to speak in different tongues (v 10). This has been one of the most controversial and most misunderstood gifts of all. When the original outpouring of the Holy Spirit came on Pentecost, there were many speaking in tongues. Paul wrote about tongues extensively in 1 Corinthians, chapters twelve through fourteen, but he was reproving the Corinthians for misusing the gift. It’s very difficult out of this passage to get any kind of mandate to speak in tongues, to get any kind of affirmation that this is something to be sought, because what you have here are primarily corrective orders given to the Corinthians. They had actually prostituted the gift of tongues into something pagan that wasn’t even representative of the work of the Spirit. All you need to do is to go back to Acts 2 and read verse 4, “They were all filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak with other languages”. The literal translation in Greek is “glossa” and means tongues. This same word “glossa” (language) is used again in Acts 2:11. This means it is a known language not some unknown tongue. Then it says (in Acts 2:5-11) that there were unbelievers present at Pentecost and were hearing God’s message in their own “dialektos” dialects or language: “Now there were staying in Jerusalem God-fearing Jews from every nation under heaven. When they heard this sound, a crowd came together in bewilderment, because each one heard their own language being spoken. Utterly amazed, they asked: “Aren’t all these who are speaking Galileans? Then how is it that each of us hears them in our native language? Parthians, Medes and Elamites; residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome (both Jews and converts to Judaism); Cretans and Arabs—we hear them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues” (dialektos or dialects)! So there were unbelievers present at Pentecost hearing God’s message in their own languages and their own local dialects, not ecstatic gibberish.
One new one he shared was Acts 10:45, 46 in which Cornelius (a gentile) and his household received the Holy Spirit and burst out speaking in tongues. But why? This was a sign to Peter that the Holy Spirit was also for gentiles. He got the message. Now, we don’t need to continue getting that message, we get it, too. Jesus is for ALL. Every time someone is saved we are taught in God’s Word to recognize the fruits of the Spirit and we don’t need these miraculous signs to know that God is at work. And in my humble opinion, it is not a sound teaching of God’s to try and force people to speak in tongues to PROVE that they have received the Holy Spirit and make them feel less of a Christian if they don’t. Bible Verse Wall Art
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